4 de diciembre de 2015

Open SHOT Session "Re-inventing the human scale: Science, Technology and Global Crisis"

Dear Colleagues,
 
We invite contributors to an open session for the SHOT Annual Meeting, 22-26 June 2016 in Singapore. To propose a paper for the panel below, please send an abstract and CV (according to SHOT’s submission requirements) to matthias.heymann@css.au.dk until Dec 10, 2015.
 
For more information on the upcoming SHOT meeting see: http://www.historyoftechnology.org/call_for_papers/index.html
 
Best wishes
Matthias

 

Re-inventing the human scale: Science, Technology and Global Crisis

Organizer: Matthias Heymann, Dania Achermann, Centre for Science Studies, Aarhus University
 
 
Many crisis phenomena, such as global technological risks or economic threats, global environmental and climate change, global competition about resources etc., have shaped political and scientific discourse in the postwar era. But although they have challenged local life these global crisis phenomena did not easily translate into local response and action. Rather, tensions have risen between an increasingly integrated and globalized world on the one hand and the human scale of activity and experience on the other. This session aims at investigating the role of science and technology in the rise of these tensions.
 
Sophisticated science, complex technologies, accelerated technological change and transboundary movement of products, information, ideas and people have not only produced increased wealth in parts of the world, but also colonized the world and put pressures on local culture, life-worlds and experiences. Science and technology contributed to an increasing loss of a human dimension and scale in technology, knowledge and globalized culture. This loss of a human scale remained often hidden and invisible and, at other times, came to the fore, giving rise to uncertainty, discomfort and fear.  As a consequence, rising tensions have emerged between an integrated and globalized world and the human scale of activity and experience. 
 
We are interested in local stories about these tensions that emerged between global crisis and local life worlds and the role science and technology have played both in the emergence of crisis or in attempts to master it. The focus will be on the postwar period and stories from all world regions are invited. Contributions to the panel will investigate question such as the following:
 
·         What is the role science and technology have played in the emergence, perceptions and ideologies of global crisis and the detachment of crisis phenomena from local experience?
·         What have global challenges (caused by large-scale technologies, transboundary infrastructures, global economic integration and global environmental change) meant on the local level and for individual citizens? 
·         How did global crises and challenges translate into local perspectives, politics and action?
 

This session is an attempt to establish an international network of researchers interested in historical work about global crisis and re-inventions of the human scale in postwar global history. It is our aim to establish the basis for launching collaboration in the framework of the Tensions of Europe network, which aims at covering tensions between global crisis and local life in a broad range of knowledge domains, technologies and geographical and cultural settings.