26 de noviembre de 2016

Seminario on line: WHO Global Health Histories Webinar 100 – "Aedes aegypti": Old and New Sanitary Emergencies - 2 December 2016

You are warmly invited to the next World Health Organization Global Health Histories online webinar "Aedes aegypti": Old and New Sanitary Emergencies,” on Friday 2 December 2016 (10:00am-12.30pm BRT). Speaking at this seminar are Dr José Moya (OPAS, Venezuela), Dr Monica Garcia (Universidad del Rosario, Colombia), and Dr Marcos Cueto (COC, Fiocruz). 

*Please note the time difference between your location and the venue.*

For over a century --and with intensity in recent years-- epidemic diseases transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, such as yellow fever, Dengue and Zika, have been dramatic and recurrent events in Brazil and much of Latin America. These diseases have revealed the shortcomings of sanitary infrastructures, informed sound public health responses and stimulated innovative medical research. In order to understand the complexity of mosquito control it is necessary to contrast past and contemporary processes, achievements and challenges. 

This seminar will be broadcast live over the internet, through the following link: http://www.tvq.com.br/aovivo/fiocruz3/ . This link allows viewers to listen to the talks, view the speakers’ PowerPoint presentations and, if they wish, pose questions to the presenters and other discussants. The event website is available at https://www.york.ac.uk/history/global-health-histories/events/ghh100aedesaegyptioldandnewsanitaryemergencies/

Please do share this invitation with colleagues, students and friends who may be interested in the seminar. If you have any questions about this seminar, please feel free to email CGHH@york.ac.uk


More detailed information about recent Global Health Histories activities is available at www.york.ac.uk/history/global-health-histories/ where you can also find future seminar listings. For recordings of previous seminars, please visit our YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/user/CGHHYork 

Centre for Global Health Histories