24 de febrero de 2017

CfP: Curiosity and Cognition: Embodied Things 1400-1900

Curiosity and Cognition: Embodied Things 1400-1900

16 June 2017, 09:00 - 18:00 

Seminar room SG1, Alison Richard Building, CRASSH, Cambridge

We are pleased to announce a one-day conferencein collaboration with the CRASSH graduate seminar series ‘Things’. 
Deadline to submit: 14 March 2017
In keeping with the overall theme of this year’s seminar, the conference will centre on the issue of ‘embodied cognition.’ The aim is to further explore the cutting-edge approach of current scholarship that investigates the human understanding of the world vis-à-vis objects. It will consider the significance of embodiment in all processes of cognition and learning, moving beyond an obstructive divide between 'mind' and ‘hand’, and between ‘intellectual’ and ‘manual’ knowledge. This methodology will allow speakers to emphasise how the connection between humans and objects reveals a wider understanding of culture, and properly recognises the significance of embodied knowledge.
Dr Marta Ajmar (VARI, Victoria and Albert Museum) will deliver the keynote paper. Dr Ajmar’s current research centres on the significance of embodiment within practice and engages with questions of cognition, experiential learning, knowledge exchange and the epistemology of making.
In order to encourage a thought-provoking atmosphere, we will organise a variety of discussions throughout the conference.  In addition to a set of traditional panels with three twenty-minute papers, there will also be a round-table in which several speakers can engage with topics related to the overarching theme. The round-table will facilitate an open dialogue between both speakers and conference attendees.
We welcome paper proposals from postgraduates and early career researchers in fields including (but not restricted to) Archaeology, Anthropology, Architecture, Art and Design History, Biology, History, History of Science, Linguistics, Literature, Medicine, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociology and all areas of practice. 
We encourage proposals related (but not restricted tothe following topics:
  • concepts and theories of embodied cognition
  • the pedagogy and semiotics of embodied cognition
  • interactions between body and mind, vis-a-vis objects
  • the current academic understanding of the relationship between material objects and embodiment/embodied cognition
  • embodied practices of practitioners
  • the social relationship between the human body and objects
  • historical understandings of the use of objects in rituals
  • the role of the physical senses for understanding the use of objects in social/religious rituals
Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words and a short biography of 100 words to Annie Thwaite and Abigail Gomulkiewicz at embodiedthings@gmail.com, by 14 March 2017.